• Free shipping nationwide for purchases of 11,000 yen or more
Weston Olencki // Pearls Ground Down to Powder LP

Weston Olencki // Pearls Ground Down to Powder LP

€28,95
  • Availability:

This is a record released in May 2024 by banjo player Weston Olencki from New York, USA, on the experimental/ambient label Full Spectrum in Texas, in a limited edition of 5 copies.

Contains two 2-minute songs in which the banjo changes to various sounds such as percussion instruments, noises, and drones. DL code included.

Below is a commentary by the label.

"Pearls Ground Down to Powder presents two contradictory sides of the same banjo. The banjo instrument appears alternately as a percussive stringed drum or as a high-dimensional harmonic resonator, and explores these disparate trajectories. A vine that grew over the city and no one noticed'' [Tripticks Tapes - 'Old Time Music'] is followed by the lumbering, abstract, laser-focused 'pearls', which features a more recognizable banjo. It unfolds within the fissures in the area of ​​. With two contrasting aspects, this album offers a glitch-out algorithmic framework and a rich detuned sonority.

Recorded in the unbearable heat of the New York summer of 2022, the album's A-side, "the rocks are different, here," is a jagged, inverted song resembling the early minimal works of Philip Glass and Steve Reich. Then, a repeating polyrhythmic groove rushes in. The banjo is treated more as an ecstatic array of strings and resonators than as an instrument strummed urgently in the depths of a dark recess. But despite this mechanical cacophony, the banjo's distinctive twangs and head-thumps allow for a kind of twisted journey with this nostalgic beast. Old sounds still find a way.

The B-side, Brothers, recalls the blood harmonies of famous country singers like the Louvins, the Stanleys, the Maddoxes, the Carters, and the Osbournes. Recorded in the freezing cold at the artist's old Vermont home, the track resists the entropic fanaticism of "The Rock." Each drumhead is wired to be a microphone and a speaker, an ear and a mouth, and are coupled in reverse through independent ring modulator circuits, rotating sidebands above and below the pair. . Could it be an echo of Frida Kahlo's self-portrait? The beautiful absurdity of familial connections through a shared circulatory system evokes a mythical sense of kinship. The banjo strings are threaded through two sets of homemade E-bows, each becoming "Music on a Long Thin Wire."

The cover, assembled by Gretchen Korsmo, features a photograph of organist and composer Jack Langdon, a close collaborator of Olenki's and an essential companion in his life in New England and the development of this work. There is. "

Labels and other worksplease use this form. ///Click here to see more Full Spectrum Records releases available at Tobira. 

--------------------------------

Includes DL code. 12" black vinyl. Short-run LP with artwork by Gretchen Korsmo and Jack Langdon, edition of 100.

tracklist:

  1. the rocks are different, here 22:59
  2. Brothers 20:45 

"Full Spectrum welcomes Weston Olencki with their label debut – pearls ground down to powder.

'pearls ground down to powder' presents two opposing sides of the same banjo. The instrument presents alternately as a percussive drum-with-strings or as a highly dimensional harmonic resonator, blowing out these disparate trajectories into two longform pieces. An obtuse, abstracted , laser-focused follow up to “a vine that grew over the city and no one noticed” [Tripticks Tapes - 'Old Time Music'], 'pearls' unfurls itself within the cracks of more recognizable banjo territory. Over two contrasting sides, the album pauses to meditate on skeins of glitched-out algorithmics and masses of richly detuned sonorities - all hung heavy in the thick southern air.

Recorded in the unbearable heat of the 2022 NYC summer – the album's regimented a-side, “the rocks are different, here” presents a rush of polyrhythmic grooves that jaggedly flip and resuture themselves together in a way similar to the early minimalist works of Philip Glass or Steve Reich. The composition reaches escape velocity from the mechanical permutations of its bluegrass role: it treats the banjo as an ecstatic array of strings and resonators, rather than an instrument strummed wistfully in the depths of some dark holler. Yet despite this machinic cacophony, the particular twang and thwack of the head still allows one a kind of skewed journey with this nostalgia-laden beast. The old sound still finds a way through.

On the b-side, “Brothers” recalls the blood harmony of famous country singers like the Louvins, Stanleys, Maddoxs, Carters, and Osbournes, splayed out between two justly tuned banjos. Recorded at the artist's former Vermont home in the midst of a deep polar chill, this track resists the entropic freneticism of “the rocks...” Each drum head is wired to be both microphone and speaker, ear and mouth, conjoined together in reverse, spinning sidebands above and below the pair via an interdependent ring modulator circuit. An echo, perhaps, of that iconic Frida Kahlo self-portrait – the beautiful absurdity of familial connection via one's shared circulatory system, itself an evocative imagining of this mythological sense of kin. Through two sets of homemade E-bows, each of the banjos' strings become their own 'Music on a Long Thin Wire' – the only imprint of human touch, a muffled muting and unmuting of the instrument's delicate vibrations.

Assembled by Gretchen Korsmo, the cover features photography by organist and composer Jack Langdon, a close collaborator of Olencki's and an essential companion of their time living and developing this work in New England.
 "

Artist: Weston Olencki

Label: Full Spectrum Records

CAT No.: FS162

This is a record released in May 2024 by banjo player Weston Olencki from New York, USA, on the experimental/ambient label Full Spectrum in Texas, in a limited edition of 5 copies.

Contains two 2-minute songs in which the banjo changes to various sounds such as percussion instruments, noises, and drones. DL code included.

Below is a commentary by the label.

"Pearls Ground Down to Powder presents two contradictory sides of the same banjo. The banjo instrument appears alternately as a percussive stringed drum or as a high-dimensional harmonic resonator, and explores these disparate trajectories. A vine that grew over the city and no one noticed'' [Tripticks Tapes - 'Old Time Music'] is followed by the lumbering, abstract, laser-focused 'pearls', which features a more recognizable banjo. It unfolds within the fissures in the area of ​​. With two contrasting aspects, this album offers a glitch-out algorithmic framework and a rich detuned sonority.

Recorded in the unbearable heat of the New York summer of 2022, the album's A-side, "the rocks are different, here," is a jagged, inverted song resembling the early minimal works of Philip Glass and Steve Reich. Then, a repeating polyrhythmic groove rushes in. The banjo is treated more as an ecstatic array of strings and resonators than as an instrument strummed urgently in the depths of a dark recess. But despite this mechanical cacophony, the banjo's distinctive twangs and head-thumps allow for a kind of twisted journey with this nostalgic beast. Old sounds still find a way.

The B-side, Brothers, recalls the blood harmonies of famous country singers like the Louvins, the Stanleys, the Maddoxes, the Carters, and the Osbournes. Recorded in the freezing cold at the artist's old Vermont home, the track resists the entropic fanaticism of "The Rock." Each drumhead is wired to be a microphone and a speaker, an ear and a mouth, and are coupled in reverse through independent ring modulator circuits, rotating sidebands above and below the pair. . Could it be an echo of Frida Kahlo's self-portrait? The beautiful absurdity of familial connections through a shared circulatory system evokes a mythical sense of kinship. The banjo strings are threaded through two sets of homemade E-bows, each becoming "Music on a Long Thin Wire."

The cover, assembled by Gretchen Korsmo, features a photograph of organist and composer Jack Langdon, a close collaborator of Olenki's and an essential companion in his life in New England and the development of this work. There is. "

Labels and other worksplease use this form. ///Click here to see more Full Spectrum Records releases available at Tobira. 

--------------------------------

Includes DL code. 12" black vinyl. Short-run LP with artwork by Gretchen Korsmo and Jack Langdon, edition of 100.

tracklist:

  1. the rocks are different, here 22:59
  2. Brothers 20:45 

"Full Spectrum welcomes Weston Olencki with their label debut – pearls ground down to powder.

'pearls ground down to powder' presents two opposing sides of the same banjo. The instrument presents alternately as a percussive drum-with-strings or as a highly dimensional harmonic resonator, blowing out these disparate trajectories into two longform pieces. An obtuse, abstracted , laser-focused follow up to “a vine that grew over the city and no one noticed” [Tripticks Tapes - 'Old Time Music'], 'pearls' unfurls itself within the cracks of more recognizable banjo territory. Over two contrasting sides, the album pauses to meditate on skeins of glitched-out algorithmics and masses of richly detuned sonorities - all hung heavy in the thick southern air.

Recorded in the unbearable heat of the 2022 NYC summer – the album's regimented a-side, “the rocks are different, here” presents a rush of polyrhythmic grooves that jaggedly flip and resuture themselves together in a way similar to the early minimalist works of Philip Glass or Steve Reich. The composition reaches escape velocity from the mechanical permutations of its bluegrass role: it treats the banjo as an ecstatic array of strings and resonators, rather than an instrument strummed wistfully in the depths of some dark holler. Yet despite this machinic cacophony, the particular twang and thwack of the head still allows one a kind of skewed journey with this nostalgia-laden beast. The old sound still finds a way through.

On the b-side, “Brothers” recalls the blood harmony of famous country singers like the Louvins, Stanleys, Maddoxs, Carters, and Osbournes, splayed out between two justly tuned banjos. Recorded at the artist's former Vermont home in the midst of a deep polar chill, this track resists the entropic freneticism of “the rocks...” Each drum head is wired to be both microphone and speaker, ear and mouth, conjoined together in reverse, spinning sidebands above and below the pair via an interdependent ring modulator circuit. An echo, perhaps, of that iconic Frida Kahlo self-portrait – the beautiful absurdity of familial connection via one's shared circulatory system, itself an evocative imagining of this mythological sense of kin. Through two sets of homemade E-bows, each of the banjos' strings become their own 'Music on a Long Thin Wire' – the only imprint of human touch, a muffled muting and unmuting of the instrument's delicate vibrations.

Assembled by Gretchen Korsmo, the cover features photography by organist and composer Jack Langdon, a close collaborator of Olencki's and an essential companion of their time living and developing this work in New England.
 "

Artist: Weston Olencki

Label: Full Spectrum Records

CAT No.: FS162