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Matt LaJoie // Red Resonant Earth LP/TAPE

Matt LaJoie // Red Resonant Earth LP/TAPE

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This is the latest album released by post-New Age guitarist Matt LaJoie in Maine, USA in October 2021 on his own label, Flower Room.

Includes 9 songs from The Peach Blossom Ambient by electric guitar.With power stones that are different one by oneDL code included.

The following is a commentary by the writer himself.

"My birth chart is said to have an aspect that suggests that my lifework is a" spiritual gardener. "This can be interpreted literally or figuratively, but I say that it strengthens the conscious and metaphysical connection from space to the things of the earth so that all sensory life can be experienced. I understand this most clearly through my natural orientation.This is an art in all media, just as the gardener is a creative medium that transcends higher powers to the material side, and the material of the earth is transformed in countless ways to entertain our senses. It can be considered an essential job of the house.Great horticulturists say that most of the life-growth "work" is merely guiding, growing and editing in the process of sunlight, air, water, minerals and seeds entering into perfect co-creative development. I understand.And improvisation and spontaneity, or inspiration-based behavior, can be seen as an echo of the endless unfolding creative impulses of nature.

Improvisation has always been an important element of my music, but over the last few months, while working on the Colander project, one song a day, it has become the * only * part of my creative process.Beyond that, my job is purely an editor, like a pruner.What I find fascinating about this practice (in a religious sense) is that there is always something waiting to be experienced and expressed.The seeds that drift in the wind seek the consciousness of the gardener and the receptiveness to plant them firmly in the soil.I think this is the only way to explain where these songs came from.

Red Resonant Earth recorded two 2021-minute sessions in his home studio in March 3 and was the first recording he made at his third home in the past year.I was immediately attracted to my new housemate Danelectro 45M 2-string electric guitar, and after a quick tuning, I hurriedly set up the equipment to start recording right away.Put your guitar in a Line 1 DL3 delay / looper and put it directly on the board, the simplest setup possible.

The session conveys the delicate feeling of a new instrument ("Red Resonant Earth") and the exhilarating, bold and free playfulness ("Return to Rock Pick Mountain"), alternating with the same song ("Forest Sanctuary"). , "Rusted Chalice", "Born Free"). Twelve-string guitars (even modified 12-strings in past recordings) feel good for expressing the sacred music of nature and the eerieness of modern people sinking into the wilderness.A stringed instrument that growls slightly off the perfect academic harmony (“Sprout”), a drone that snuggles up to the semi-scale (“Taos Hum> Claymaking”), and a non-weighed or incomplete loop that mimics the rhythm of a bird's song (“Gilded”). Hilt, "Mammoth"), etc. are reminiscent of idyllic and sacred things.The existence of electricity and technology is also respected, such as electronically manipulating the strings of a guitar to make it sound like industrial noise or synthesizer, looping, inverting, speeding up or slowing down.Perhaps this is a modern revival of American transcendentalism, embracing technology with the potential to expand sympathy and communication, and finding a place where machines and gardens coexist as easy collaborators. ..

However, the meaning I put in here is superfluous.Indeed, these philosophies were not in my mind while the music was being made.In fact, right after the two sessions, I got the impression that I wasn't doing much.But a few weeks later, as I was mixing and editing, I gradually learned.One song was made for the wind.I wanted these songs to be planted.May it resonate.

Labels and other workshere /// Click here to see more Flower Room releases available at Tobira.

-----------------------------

Vinyl edition of 400.

Tape edition of 100.
Held in clear polybox with two-sided pro-printed wraparound tip-on cover, hand-numbered to 100, and includes a small red tiger iron gemstone.

*****

Artist statement by Matt LaJoie, July 2021 :

"I've been told there is an aspect of my birth chart that suggests my life's work as being that of a "spiritual gardener". This can be interpreted in both literal and metaphysical ways, but I understand it most clearly through my natural orientation to reinforce the conscious, metaphysical link from the cosmos to the stuff of Earth, as can be experienced by all sentient life. Just as the gardener is the creative medium through which higher forces transcend to the material plane, allowing Earth matter to be transformed in myriad Great horticulturists understand that most of the "work" of raising life is merely being a guiding, fostering, and editing hand in the process. through this vision, we can experience nature as our closest terrestrial analogue to Divinity, and to view imp rovisation and spontaneity--inspired action--as an echo of the original creative impulse that is endlessly unfolding in the natural world.

Improvisation has always been a key component of my music, but over the past several months while working on my song-a-day Colander project, it has become the * only * part of my creative process. Beyond that step, my work is purely What I've found fascinating about this practice (which I mean in the religious sense) is that there's always more waiting to be experienced and expressed; seeds drifting on the winds, seeking the gardener's awareness and receptive hand to plant them firmly in the soil. I think this is the only way I can explain where these songs came from.

Red Resonant Earth was recorded in March 2021 across two 45-minute sessions at our home studio, the first recordings made in my third home of the past year. I was instantly drawn to our new housemate's Danelectro 59M 12-string electric guitar, and after a quick tuning hastily set up gear to start recording immediately. The guitar went into a Line 6 DL4 delay / looper, then directly into the board --as simple a setup as possible.

What comes across in the sessions is a sensitive feeling out of a new instrument ("Red Resonant Earth"), alternating with an invigorated, boldly free playfulness ("Return to Rock Pick Mountain"), often within the same song ("Forest Sanctuary") "," Rusted Chalice "," Born Free "). 12-string guitar (and the modified 10-string I have often used on past recordings) feels uniquely suited to music honoring the sanctity of nature, as well as the uncanniness of being Strings buzzing just slightly out of perfect academic harmony ("Sprout"), drones leaning into a cicadan scale ("Taos Hum> Claymaking"), and unmetered or imperfect loops that mimic the rhythms of birdsong (" Gilded Hilt "," Mammoth ") evoke both the pastoral and the rapturously sacred. The presence of electricity and technology are also honored --guitar strings electronically manipulated into industrial noise or synthesizer-like tones, looped, reversed, sped up and slowed down. Perhaps this is a mod ern echo of American Transcendentalism, one that embraces technology for its potential for expanded communion and communication, finding a place where the machine and the garden coexist as easy collaborators.

But the meaning I'm imbuing here is superfluous: certainly, these philosophies were not on my mind as the music was being created. In fact, immediately after both sessions I had the impression that not much of value had been accomplished at all. Mixing And editing the tracks weeks later, however, I began to get the picture. Some songs are meant for the winds: ephemeral, to be heard in a single moment by the elements and unseen beings. These songs wished to be planted. May they resonate."

*****

:

Jarrod Annis, Aquarium Drunkard:

"Matt LaJoie has been a wellspring of cosmically attuned guitar explorations under a multitude of monikers since co-founding the uncannily prolific Flower Room label with Ash Brooks in 2017. The sprawling automatic compositions of Red Resonant Earth spring like mycorrhizae from the groundwork laid by kosimiche forerunners Immaculately looped passages of electric twelve-string wind like nimble tendrils through the opening textures of'Born Free' and'Sprout' before burrowing into the darker hues of' Mammoth'and'Taos Hum> Claymaking,' which spin out like Terry Riley and Roger McGuinn locked in perpetual dervish. When paired with Land Mass, a digital / tape counterpart via Flower Room, Red Resonant Earth exemplifies the grand expanse of LaJoie's sonic vision It's music that delves deep into the reaches of the underland while LaJoie holds the lamp, pressing ever onward through subter ranean caverns, his picking glimmering like caches of amethyst, until we emerge once again to see the light of the world anew. "


*****

Keith Hadad, Record Crates United:

"Matt LaJoie continues to conjure the very spirit of nature itself through his cosmic guitar wizardry on the excellent Red Resonant Earth. The tracks on this album feature nothing but LaJoie's bright guitar lines, all overdubbed and layered on top of each other, rippling and blending together On songs like “Forest Sanctuary,” the 12-string mimics the movement of tree branches swaying in the breeze and the patterns of dancing sunlight that peek around the leaves. The sound of the guitar, which at times is similar to an electric oud, is always as pleasant and golden as dawn's first light and as sweet as an ocean breeze.

Elsewhere on the album, like the title track, LaJoie even creates high-pitched percussive twinkling sounds with his instrument, which produces a dazzling sensation. It easily brings to mind images of things like bright lunar reflections shimmering across the choppy surface of a nocturnal sea. or a night sky full of streaking meteors.

Throughout the album, LaJoie's guitar playing is always meditative and relaxed, as though he is actively experiencing the natural scenes that he's projecting through his improvisations in real time. You get the sense that wandering down his fret board like this is his way of reaching a deep, internal peace. Fans of Popol Vuh, Jerry Garcia and Michael Rother need this record (and all of LaJoie's records, for that matter). " 

*****

Andy French, Raven Sings The Blues:

"Matt LaJoie's current run of improvised records has been fruitful to say the least. Spanning three recordings over the past couple of years, and drawing from an elemental aura — the first water, the second fire, and now an album of songs meant to return to the earth — his latest finds Matt nudging the album to life with a horticulturalist's eye. Recorded over two 45-minute sessions on an unfamiliar instrument (a borrowed Danelectro 59M 12-string electric guitar) Red Resonant Earth folds in many of themes of his previous two outings, the tone shifts, but he lets the dewy air feed his creation and the sun's warmth urge the seeds of songs to fruition.

At its core there's a must of soil that hangs heavy, but more so a feeling of growth and of life to the pieces. Songs like “Rusted Chalice” and “Gilded Hilt” have a cyclical nature to them — blooming, stretching, receding. The songs turn towards the sun in slow movements. They inhale anxieties, exhale focus. It's easy to get lost inside of LaJoie's playing, but once the dream of strings evaporates into the air, the peace lingers in the synapses long after. If Everlasting Spring and Paraclete Tongue already grace your collection, then I don't think any convincing is needed, but newcomer or old, this is another strong argument that LaJoie's works are essentials antigens to the forces of chaos constantly brewing. " 

*****

 

Artist: Matt LaJoie

Label: Flower Room

+ -

This is the latest album released by post-New Age guitarist Matt LaJoie in Maine, USA in October 2021 on his own label, Flower Room.

Includes 9 songs from The Peach Blossom Ambient by electric guitar.With power stones that are different one by oneDL code included.

The following is a commentary by the writer himself.

"My birth chart is said to have an aspect that suggests that my lifework is a" spiritual gardener. "This can be interpreted literally or figuratively, but I say that it strengthens the conscious and metaphysical connection from space to the things of the earth so that all sensory life can be experienced. I understand this most clearly through my natural orientation.This is an art in all media, just as the gardener is a creative medium that transcends higher powers to the material side, and the material of the earth is transformed in countless ways to entertain our senses. It can be considered an essential job of the house.Great horticulturists say that most of the life-growth "work" is merely guiding, growing and editing in the process of sunlight, air, water, minerals and seeds entering into perfect co-creative development. I understand.And improvisation and spontaneity, or inspiration-based behavior, can be seen as an echo of the endless unfolding creative impulses of nature.

Improvisation has always been an important element of my music, but over the last few months, while working on the Colander project, one song a day, it has become the * only * part of my creative process.Beyond that, my job is purely an editor, like a pruner.What I find fascinating about this practice (in a religious sense) is that there is always something waiting to be experienced and expressed.The seeds that drift in the wind seek the consciousness of the gardener and the receptiveness to plant them firmly in the soil.I think this is the only way to explain where these songs came from.

Red Resonant Earth recorded two 2021-minute sessions in his home studio in March 3 and was the first recording he made at his third home in the past year.I was immediately attracted to my new housemate Danelectro 45M 2-string electric guitar, and after a quick tuning, I hurriedly set up the equipment to start recording right away.Put your guitar in a Line 1 DL3 delay / looper and put it directly on the board, the simplest setup possible.

The session conveys the delicate feeling of a new instrument ("Red Resonant Earth") and the exhilarating, bold and free playfulness ("Return to Rock Pick Mountain"), alternating with the same song ("Forest Sanctuary"). , "Rusted Chalice", "Born Free"). Twelve-string guitars (even modified 12-strings in past recordings) feel good for expressing the sacred music of nature and the eerieness of modern people sinking into the wilderness.A stringed instrument that growls slightly off the perfect academic harmony (“Sprout”), a drone that snuggles up to the semi-scale (“Taos Hum> Claymaking”), and a non-weighed or incomplete loop that mimics the rhythm of a bird's song (“Gilded”). Hilt, "Mammoth"), etc. are reminiscent of idyllic and sacred things.The existence of electricity and technology is also respected, such as electronically manipulating the strings of a guitar to make it sound like industrial noise or synthesizer, looping, inverting, speeding up or slowing down.Perhaps this is a modern revival of American transcendentalism, embracing technology with the potential to expand sympathy and communication, and finding a place where machines and gardens coexist as easy collaborators. ..

However, the meaning I put in here is superfluous.Indeed, these philosophies were not in my mind while the music was being made.In fact, right after the two sessions, I got the impression that I wasn't doing much.But a few weeks later, as I was mixing and editing, I gradually learned.One song was made for the wind.I wanted these songs to be planted.May it resonate.

Labels and other workshere /// Click here to see more Flower Room releases available at Tobira.

-----------------------------

Vinyl edition of 400.

Tape edition of 100.
Held in clear polybox with two-sided pro-printed wraparound tip-on cover, hand-numbered to 100, and includes a small red tiger iron gemstone.

*****

Artist statement by Matt LaJoie, July 2021 :

"I've been told there is an aspect of my birth chart that suggests my life's work as being that of a "spiritual gardener". This can be interpreted in both literal and metaphysical ways, but I understand it most clearly through my natural orientation to reinforce the conscious, metaphysical link from the cosmos to the stuff of Earth, as can be experienced by all sentient life. Just as the gardener is the creative medium through which higher forces transcend to the material plane, allowing Earth matter to be transformed in myriad Great horticulturists understand that most of the "work" of raising life is merely being a guiding, fostering, and editing hand in the process. through this vision, we can experience nature as our closest terrestrial analogue to Divinity, and to view imp rovisation and spontaneity--inspired action--as an echo of the original creative impulse that is endlessly unfolding in the natural world.

Improvisation has always been a key component of my music, but over the past several months while working on my song-a-day Colander project, it has become the * only * part of my creative process. Beyond that step, my work is purely What I've found fascinating about this practice (which I mean in the religious sense) is that there's always more waiting to be experienced and expressed; seeds drifting on the winds, seeking the gardener's awareness and receptive hand to plant them firmly in the soil. I think this is the only way I can explain where these songs came from.

Red Resonant Earth was recorded in March 2021 across two 45-minute sessions at our home studio, the first recordings made in my third home of the past year. I was instantly drawn to our new housemate's Danelectro 59M 12-string electric guitar, and after a quick tuning hastily set up gear to start recording immediately. The guitar went into a Line 6 DL4 delay / looper, then directly into the board --as simple a setup as possible.

What comes across in the sessions is a sensitive feeling out of a new instrument ("Red Resonant Earth"), alternating with an invigorated, boldly free playfulness ("Return to Rock Pick Mountain"), often within the same song ("Forest Sanctuary") "," Rusted Chalice "," Born Free "). 12-string guitar (and the modified 10-string I have often used on past recordings) feels uniquely suited to music honoring the sanctity of nature, as well as the uncanniness of being Strings buzzing just slightly out of perfect academic harmony ("Sprout"), drones leaning into a cicadan scale ("Taos Hum> Claymaking"), and unmetered or imperfect loops that mimic the rhythms of birdsong (" Gilded Hilt "," Mammoth ") evoke both the pastoral and the rapturously sacred. The presence of electricity and technology are also honored --guitar strings electronically manipulated into industrial noise or synthesizer-like tones, looped, reversed, sped up and slowed down. Perhaps this is a mod ern echo of American Transcendentalism, one that embraces technology for its potential for expanded communion and communication, finding a place where the machine and the garden coexist as easy collaborators.

But the meaning I'm imbuing here is superfluous: certainly, these philosophies were not on my mind as the music was being created. In fact, immediately after both sessions I had the impression that not much of value had been accomplished at all. Mixing And editing the tracks weeks later, however, I began to get the picture. Some songs are meant for the winds: ephemeral, to be heard in a single moment by the elements and unseen beings. These songs wished to be planted. May they resonate."

*****

:

Jarrod Annis, Aquarium Drunkard:

"Matt LaJoie has been a wellspring of cosmically attuned guitar explorations under a multitude of monikers since co-founding the uncannily prolific Flower Room label with Ash Brooks in 2017. The sprawling automatic compositions of Red Resonant Earth spring like mycorrhizae from the groundwork laid by kosimiche forerunners Immaculately looped passages of electric twelve-string wind like nimble tendrils through the opening textures of'Born Free' and'Sprout' before burrowing into the darker hues of' Mammoth'and'Taos Hum> Claymaking,' which spin out like Terry Riley and Roger McGuinn locked in perpetual dervish. When paired with Land Mass, a digital / tape counterpart via Flower Room, Red Resonant Earth exemplifies the grand expanse of LaJoie's sonic vision It's music that delves deep into the reaches of the underland while LaJoie holds the lamp, pressing ever onward through subter ranean caverns, his picking glimmering like caches of amethyst, until we emerge once again to see the light of the world anew. "


*****

Keith Hadad, Record Crates United:

"Matt LaJoie continues to conjure the very spirit of nature itself through his cosmic guitar wizardry on the excellent Red Resonant Earth. The tracks on this album feature nothing but LaJoie's bright guitar lines, all overdubbed and layered on top of each other, rippling and blending together On songs like “Forest Sanctuary,” the 12-string mimics the movement of tree branches swaying in the breeze and the patterns of dancing sunlight that peek around the leaves. The sound of the guitar, which at times is similar to an electric oud, is always as pleasant and golden as dawn's first light and as sweet as an ocean breeze.

Elsewhere on the album, like the title track, LaJoie even creates high-pitched percussive twinkling sounds with his instrument, which produces a dazzling sensation. It easily brings to mind images of things like bright lunar reflections shimmering across the choppy surface of a nocturnal sea. or a night sky full of streaking meteors.

Throughout the album, LaJoie's guitar playing is always meditative and relaxed, as though he is actively experiencing the natural scenes that he's projecting through his improvisations in real time. You get the sense that wandering down his fret board like this is his way of reaching a deep, internal peace. Fans of Popol Vuh, Jerry Garcia and Michael Rother need this record (and all of LaJoie's records, for that matter). " 

*****

Andy French, Raven Sings The Blues:

"Matt LaJoie's current run of improvised records has been fruitful to say the least. Spanning three recordings over the past couple of years, and drawing from an elemental aura — the first water, the second fire, and now an album of songs meant to return to the earth — his latest finds Matt nudging the album to life with a horticulturalist's eye. Recorded over two 45-minute sessions on an unfamiliar instrument (a borrowed Danelectro 59M 12-string electric guitar) Red Resonant Earth folds in many of themes of his previous two outings, the tone shifts, but he lets the dewy air feed his creation and the sun's warmth urge the seeds of songs to fruition.

At its core there's a must of soil that hangs heavy, but more so a feeling of growth and of life to the pieces. Songs like “Rusted Chalice” and “Gilded Hilt” have a cyclical nature to them — blooming, stretching, receding. The songs turn towards the sun in slow movements. They inhale anxieties, exhale focus. It's easy to get lost inside of LaJoie's playing, but once the dream of strings evaporates into the air, the peace lingers in the synapses long after. If Everlasting Spring and Paraclete Tongue already grace your collection, then I don't think any convincing is needed, but newcomer or old, this is another strong argument that LaJoie's works are essentials antigens to the forces of chaos constantly brewing. " 

*****

 

Artist: Matt LaJoie

Label: Flower Room