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Idjah Hadidjah & Jugala Jaipongan // Jaipongan Music of West Java 2xLP

Idjah Hadidjah & Jugala Jaipongan // Jaipongan Music of West Java 2xLP

¥ 3,480
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In the early 1960s, the Indonesian government banned Western music, especially rock, altogether in order to foster a unique music culture.However, some musicians who were afraid to be conservative tried to update the classical performing arts to the present age, and the genre that was born is Jaipongan.The feature is that drums are often used based on the tone of gamelan. The first piece is a Jaipongan advocateWith the Jugara Orchestra led by Khumbila,The performance by national singer Ija Hadilla is recorded, and the second piece contains rework by artists from various countries.

The form of jaipongan we know today was born from the fields of Java where an early form of music called ketuk-tilu echoed over fields during harvest times. Known for intense and complex drumming coordinated with equally dynamic solo female dancing, ketuk-tilu performances included a rebab (a small upright bowed instrument), a gong, and ketuk-tilu (“three kettle gongs”). Though the original performance context of this music revolved around planting and harvesting rituals, with the singer accepting male dancing partners, over time activities in the first half of the twentieth century that were best suited amongst the elements of harvest and outside of urban criticism. Ketuk-tilu became an outlet for village life expressing fertility, sensuality, eroticism, and, at times, socially accepted prostitution.
--Hive Mind Records

Artist: Idjah Hadidjah & Jugala Jaipongan

Label: Hive Mind Records

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In the early 1960s, the Indonesian government banned Western music, especially rock, altogether in order to foster a unique music culture.However, some musicians who were afraid to be conservative tried to update the classical performing arts to the present age, and the genre that was born is Jaipongan.The feature is that drums are often used based on the tone of gamelan. The first piece is a Jaipongan advocateWith the Jugara Orchestra led by Khumbila,The performance by national singer Ija Hadilla is recorded, and the second piece contains rework by artists from various countries.

The form of jaipongan we know today was born from the fields of Java where an early form of music called ketuk-tilu echoed over fields during harvest times. Known for intense and complex drumming coordinated with equally dynamic solo female dancing, ketuk-tilu performances included a rebab (a small upright bowed instrument), a gong, and ketuk-tilu (“three kettle gongs”). Though the original performance context of this music revolved around planting and harvesting rituals, with the singer accepting male dancing partners, over time activities in the first half of the twentieth century that were best suited amongst the elements of harvest and outside of urban criticism. Ketuk-tilu became an outlet for village life expressing fertility, sensuality, eroticism, and, at times, socially accepted prostitution.
--Hive Mind Records

Artist: Idjah Hadidjah & Jugala Jaipongan

Label: Hive Mind Records