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Petteril // The Leems Boyste TAPE

Petteril // The Leems Boyste TAPE

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British ambient artist Petteril will release an ambient label in New York, USA in May 2023.Cassette released from Puremagnetik.

Includes 5 ambient drones and neo-classical ambient songs by piano and tape. Comes with DL code.

Below is a commentary by the label.

Petteril's The Leems Boyste considers the surreal and supposedly true story known as "The Dodleston Message". Petteril, who stumbled upon a YouTube video showcasing the story's premise, was fascinated by the bizarre tale and decided to investigate further.In the weeks that followed, Petteril's musical career immersed himself in a tale of eerie and supernatural subjects.

says Petteril. "A 16th century man communicating with a 2109s British schoolteacher through a BBC microphone put into a chimney by a ghostly entity from 1980!"

Dodleston message:
In the early 1980s, before the spread of the World Wide Web, a man in the village of Dodleston, England, through the word processing software on a BBC microcomputer Model B, was able to create a 16th-century figure, or simply 2109, from the future. claimed to be able to communicate with beings.He later published that conversation in his 1989 book The Vertical Plane.During the last two years of discourse, various "experts" have been invited to investigate the phenomenon, but have been unable to come up with a convincing explanation or prove or deny the hoax.The message died out in 2, but a final prophetic disclosure from 1986 reveals that "there is another human being" and a book that may "make other worlds seem less distant." (written by a 2109th-century man during his lifetime) exists, and that it is hidden somewhere in Oxford to this day.

"The picture this story paints is very compelling, and whether it's true or not, it's still a great sci-fi concept with a really idiosyncratic mood. It's spooky, dark, brooding. 1500s. The gloomy, gray countryside of England, the green glow of terminals projected onto CRT screens of early '80s computer technology, and the mysterious future beings with apparent purpose but unwillingness to reveal it. There's something very fascinating about the juxtaposition of the two: as the premise of the story unraveled, more and more strange things happened, that sense of eerie, strangeness andI came to want to express the gloomy through my music.The visuals in my head are very rigid and shaded, and I like that sort of thing. ”

Leems Boyste means "box of light" in Early Modern English (EModE), a glowing device in the chimney used by 16th century characters (Lucas/Thomas Harden) to send timeless messages. is expressed in this way.

The story has been featured in podcasts, YouTube videos, blogs, and even a subreddit.There, theorists and investigators scrutinize and discuss the text of The Vertical Airplane, search Thomas' books like they did in the Indiana Jones movies, and buy up old BBC microcomputers to try to recreate the phenomenon. increase. Original paperback copies of The Vertical Plane, published in 1989, are extremely popular and fetch close to £500 online. "

Labels and other works Click here for more information. ///Click here to see more Puremagnetik releases available at Tobira. 

-------------------------

Includes DL code. 

Puremagnetik:

"Petteril's 'The Leems Boyste' is a contemplation of the surreal and allegedly true story known as 'The Doddleston Messages'. After stumbling upon a YouTube video introducing the premise of the story, Petteril was so fascinated by the bizarre tale that he investigated further. In the weeks that followed Petteril's musical practice was consumed with the eerie, supernatural subject matter of the story.

Petteril says, "It was just so bizarre. A Sixteenth-century man communicating with a school teacher in 1980s England via a BBC micro that was put in his chimney by an incorporeal entity from 2109?!"

'The Doddleston Messages':
In the early 1980s, before the world wide web, a man in the village of Doddleston, England claimed that via word processing software on his BBC microcomputer Model B, he was able to communicate with a person from the 16th Century and with an entity from the future known simply as 2109. He later published their conversations in his 1989 book 'The Vertical Plane'. During the two-year discourse, various 'experts' were brought in to investigate the phenomenon but they were unable to offer a satisfactory explanation nor to prove or discount a hoax. when a final prophetic disclosure from 2109 revealed "there is another person" and that there exists a book (written by the 16th Century man before he died) which might "make other worlds not seem so distant" and which is to this day still hidden somewhere in Oxford.

"The picture that the story paints is so enticing, whether it's true or not—and obviously it's probably not— it's still a brilliant science fiction concept with a really singular mood to it. It's so spooky, dark and gloomy. There's something so appealing about that juxtaposition of dismal, gray, rural 1500s England; with the green glow of a terminal on the CRT screen of early stage 80's computer tech; with a cryptic future entity harbouring an apparent purpose but reticent to reveal its objective. the story unravelled, more and more weird things happened. That feeling of eerie bizarreness just became how I wanted my music to sound for ages afterwards. I wanted to channel the gloom! kind of stuff."
Petteril

The "Leems Boyste" is Early Modern English (EModE) for 'box of lights' which is how the 16th Century character (Lukas/Tomas Harden), describes the glowing device in his chimney that he uses to send his time-defying messages.

The story has been covered in podcast format, via various YouTube videos and blogs and even has a subreddit where theorists and investigators scrutinise and discuss the text of the Vertical Plane, search for Tomas' book, like something from an Indiana Jones movie and buy up old BBC Micro computers trying to replicate the phenomenon. Original paperback copies of 1989's 'The Vertical Plane' are highly sought after and can sell for close to £500 online although it is possible to find digital versions of the book with a little googling.
 "

Artist: Petteril

Label: Puremagnetik

+ -

British ambient artist Petteril will release an ambient label in New York, USA in May 2023.Cassette released from Puremagnetik.

Includes 5 ambient drones and neo-classical ambient songs by piano and tape. Comes with DL code.

Below is a commentary by the label.

Petteril's The Leems Boyste considers the surreal and supposedly true story known as "The Dodleston Message". Petteril, who stumbled upon a YouTube video showcasing the story's premise, was fascinated by the bizarre tale and decided to investigate further.In the weeks that followed, Petteril's musical career immersed himself in a tale of eerie and supernatural subjects.

says Petteril. "A 16th century man communicating with a 2109s British schoolteacher through a BBC microphone put into a chimney by a ghostly entity from 1980!"

Dodleston message:
In the early 1980s, before the spread of the World Wide Web, a man in the village of Dodleston, England, through the word processing software on a BBC microcomputer Model B, was able to create a 16th-century figure, or simply 2109, from the future. claimed to be able to communicate with beings.He later published that conversation in his 1989 book The Vertical Plane.During the last two years of discourse, various "experts" have been invited to investigate the phenomenon, but have been unable to come up with a convincing explanation or prove or deny the hoax.The message died out in 2, but a final prophetic disclosure from 1986 reveals that "there is another human being" and a book that may "make other worlds seem less distant." (written by a 2109th-century man during his lifetime) exists, and that it is hidden somewhere in Oxford to this day.

"The picture this story paints is very compelling, and whether it's true or not, it's still a great sci-fi concept with a really idiosyncratic mood. It's spooky, dark, brooding. 1500s. The gloomy, gray countryside of England, the green glow of terminals projected onto CRT screens of early '80s computer technology, and the mysterious future beings with apparent purpose but unwillingness to reveal it. There's something very fascinating about the juxtaposition of the two: as the premise of the story unraveled, more and more strange things happened, that sense of eerie, strangeness andI came to want to express the gloomy through my music.The visuals in my head are very rigid and shaded, and I like that sort of thing. ”

Leems Boyste means "box of light" in Early Modern English (EModE), a glowing device in the chimney used by 16th century characters (Lucas/Thomas Harden) to send timeless messages. is expressed in this way.

The story has been featured in podcasts, YouTube videos, blogs, and even a subreddit.There, theorists and investigators scrutinize and discuss the text of The Vertical Airplane, search Thomas' books like they did in the Indiana Jones movies, and buy up old BBC microcomputers to try to recreate the phenomenon. increase. Original paperback copies of The Vertical Plane, published in 1989, are extremely popular and fetch close to £500 online. "

Labels and other works Click here for more information. ///Click here to see more Puremagnetik releases available at Tobira. 

-------------------------

Includes DL code. 

Puremagnetik:

"Petteril's 'The Leems Boyste' is a contemplation of the surreal and allegedly true story known as 'The Doddleston Messages'. After stumbling upon a YouTube video introducing the premise of the story, Petteril was so fascinated by the bizarre tale that he investigated further. In the weeks that followed Petteril's musical practice was consumed with the eerie, supernatural subject matter of the story.

Petteril says, "It was just so bizarre. A Sixteenth-century man communicating with a school teacher in 1980s England via a BBC micro that was put in his chimney by an incorporeal entity from 2109?!"

'The Doddleston Messages':
In the early 1980s, before the world wide web, a man in the village of Doddleston, England claimed that via word processing software on his BBC microcomputer Model B, he was able to communicate with a person from the 16th Century and with an entity from the future known simply as 2109. He later published their conversations in his 1989 book 'The Vertical Plane'. During the two-year discourse, various 'experts' were brought in to investigate the phenomenon but they were unable to offer a satisfactory explanation nor to prove or discount a hoax. when a final prophetic disclosure from 2109 revealed "there is another person" and that there exists a book (written by the 16th Century man before he died) which might "make other worlds not seem so distant" and which is to this day still hidden somewhere in Oxford.

"The picture that the story paints is so enticing, whether it's true or not—and obviously it's probably not— it's still a brilliant science fiction concept with a really singular mood to it. It's so spooky, dark and gloomy. There's something so appealing about that juxtaposition of dismal, gray, rural 1500s England; with the green glow of a terminal on the CRT screen of early stage 80's computer tech; with a cryptic future entity harbouring an apparent purpose but reticent to reveal its objective. the story unravelled, more and more weird things happened. That feeling of eerie bizarreness just became how I wanted my music to sound for ages afterwards. I wanted to channel the gloom! kind of stuff."
Petteril

The "Leems Boyste" is Early Modern English (EModE) for 'box of lights' which is how the 16th Century character (Lukas/Tomas Harden), describes the glowing device in his chimney that he uses to send his time-defying messages.

The story has been covered in podcast format, via various YouTube videos and blogs and even has a subreddit where theorists and investigators scrutinise and discuss the text of the Vertical Plane, search for Tomas' book, like something from an Indiana Jones movie and buy up old BBC Micro computers trying to replicate the phenomenon. Original paperback copies of 1989's 'The Vertical Plane' are highly sought after and can sell for close to £500 online although it is possible to find digital versions of the book with a little googling.
 "

Artist: Petteril

Label: Puremagnetik