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Frederik Croene // Solastalgia LP

Frederik Croene // Solastalgia LP

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Belgian pianist Frederik Croene will launch his country's experimental label in September 2022.A limited edition record of 400 copies released by Cortizona.

Includes 4 piano contemporary songs with the concept of climate change.DL code included.

The following is a commentary by the writer himself.

We still haven't found the words to talk about the worrying signs of climate change. It's normal to feel uneasy walking through the autumn leaves in early August.But how do we communicate that?We don't want to be hysterical fanatics.

With this music, I try to focus on the pain of the climate itself, gently inviting the listener to explore their subconscious anxieties and growing environmental concerns.Just like in the real world, we avoid real problems.

On this album, four different endeavors pave the way for communication about the deeper pain that ultimately connects us all.My general method is to start with a soothing melody full of false nostalgia, shift gears into self-destruct mode, and then morph into painful question marks.

The first part opens with an idyllic melody accompanied by repeated notes, like the echo of a distant, muted alarm.The melody begins to be poignantly explained into a high-range dissonant melody like Ravel's Gaspard de la Nite.

In the second track, a Beatles-like warm melody (And I love her) confronts a strange hippie mantra like a later Lennon song.Sentences are reduced to syllables, resulting in lone sounds that crash and tremble under the weight of too much meaning.Like Shostakovich's latest Sonata for viola and piano.

Bach's Erbarme dich, Mein Gott's descending melody echoes in the upper and lower voicings of the 3rd piece, juxtaposed with Ennio Morricone's threatening western dot rhythm accompaniment.This rhythm eventually becomes Captain Beefheart's early ecology warning song from 1972, Blabber and Smoke (There's a big windowpane/There's pain in your window, it's gonna hang you up,...hang you up) ) will be developed to quote.

Midway through the song, the music explodes, three layers scattering over the keyboard, and maelstrom maelstrom towards another painful question mark.

With barely noticeable references to the opening notes of RZA's album Liquid Swords, the bitter answer is back in business.
The final song is a mantra of sorts, the same 7/4 pulse throughout.The keyboard's A and B dampers are released by the middle pedal and remain in resonance at all times.Melodic cells alternate with small bell-like percussive clusters of varying volume.

As I was composing this piece, I had the image of leaving church on a Sunday morning, hearing the bells ringing, and mediating between people chatting in the local dialect.Apparently I was trying to provoke a conversation like this.But the conversation is infused with fictitious and alarming topics—contemporary topics.

Labels and other works Click here for more information. ///Click here to see more Cortizona releases available at Tobira. 

---------------------------

Includes DL code + INSERT 

Frederik Croene (August '22):

We haven't found them yet, the words to talk to each other about the worrying signs of climate change. Feeling worried when walking on autumn leaves in the beginning of August should be completely normal. But how do we communicate about it? 't want to be just the next hysterical doomer.

With this music I try to focus on the climate pain itself, gently inviting the listener to investigate their latent feelings of unease and growing concerns about the environment. As in real life, we circumvent the real issues because they are just too big, there are no words,
no expressions yet.

This album tries, in four different attempts, to carve out a path towards communicating about a deeper pain that eventually will connect us all. My general method is to start with a comforting melody, full of fake nostalgia, which, after changing gear to autodestruct mode, morphs into a painful question mark.

The first part sets off with an idyllic melody, accompanied by repeated notes, as a far, muted echo of an alarm. The melody starts to explain itself painfully into a dissonant whirlwind in the high register, sounding not unlike Ravel's Gaspard de la Nuit bravura .

In the second piece a warm Beatles like melody (And I love her) gets confronted with the weird hippie mantra of a later Lennon song War is over, if you want it. Sentences get reduced to syllables and result in lonely notes that crash and shiver under the burden of too much meaning. Like Shostakovich's latest work, the Sonata for viola and piano.

The descending melody of Bach's Erbarme dich, Mein Gott is echoed in the upper and lower voicings of the third piece, juxtaposed to a typical, threatening Ennio Morricone Western dotted rhythm accompaniment. This rhythm eventually evolves into citing the 1972 Captain Beefheart early ecological warning song Blabber and Smoke (there's a big pane/pain in your window, it's gonna hang you all,… dangle you all).

Towards the middle of the piece, the music explodes and the three layers get dispersed all over the keyboard in a virtuosic maelstrom towards another painful question mark.

The bitter answer is going back to business with a barely noticeable citation of the first notes of the RZA's Liquid Swords album.
The final piece is some kind of mantra, the same 7/4 pulse all throughout the piece. The dampers of all A's and B's on the keyboard are released by the middle pedal, thus sustaining an ever present resonance. Melodic cells alternate in shifting quantifications with small, bell like percussive cluster playing.

While composing this piece an image crept up: walking out of the church on Sunday morning, tolling bells enthusiastically moderating the churchgoers' small talk in the local dialect. Apparently I have tried to evoke this kind of conversation, but injecting it with fictitious alarming conversation topics, the contemporary.

Artist: Frederik Croene 

Label: Cortizona

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Belgian pianist Frederik Croene will launch his country's experimental label in September 2022.A limited edition record of 400 copies released by Cortizona.

Includes 4 piano contemporary songs with the concept of climate change.DL code included.

The following is a commentary by the writer himself.

We still haven't found the words to talk about the worrying signs of climate change. It's normal to feel uneasy walking through the autumn leaves in early August.But how do we communicate that?We don't want to be hysterical fanatics.

With this music, I try to focus on the pain of the climate itself, gently inviting the listener to explore their subconscious anxieties and growing environmental concerns.Just like in the real world, we avoid real problems.

On this album, four different endeavors pave the way for communication about the deeper pain that ultimately connects us all.My general method is to start with a soothing melody full of false nostalgia, shift gears into self-destruct mode, and then morph into painful question marks.

The first part opens with an idyllic melody accompanied by repeated notes, like the echo of a distant, muted alarm.The melody begins to be poignantly explained into a high-range dissonant melody like Ravel's Gaspard de la Nite.

In the second track, a Beatles-like warm melody (And I love her) confronts a strange hippie mantra like a later Lennon song.Sentences are reduced to syllables, resulting in lone sounds that crash and tremble under the weight of too much meaning.Like Shostakovich's latest Sonata for viola and piano.

Bach's Erbarme dich, Mein Gott's descending melody echoes in the upper and lower voicings of the 3rd piece, juxtaposed with Ennio Morricone's threatening western dot rhythm accompaniment.This rhythm eventually becomes Captain Beefheart's early ecology warning song from 1972, Blabber and Smoke (There's a big windowpane/There's pain in your window, it's gonna hang you up,...hang you up) ) will be developed to quote.

Midway through the song, the music explodes, three layers scattering over the keyboard, and maelstrom maelstrom towards another painful question mark.

With barely noticeable references to the opening notes of RZA's album Liquid Swords, the bitter answer is back in business.
The final song is a mantra of sorts, the same 7/4 pulse throughout.The keyboard's A and B dampers are released by the middle pedal and remain in resonance at all times.Melodic cells alternate with small bell-like percussive clusters of varying volume.

As I was composing this piece, I had the image of leaving church on a Sunday morning, hearing the bells ringing, and mediating between people chatting in the local dialect.Apparently I was trying to provoke a conversation like this.But the conversation is infused with fictitious and alarming topics—contemporary topics.

Labels and other works Click here for more information. ///Click here to see more Cortizona releases available at Tobira. 

---------------------------

Includes DL code + INSERT 

Frederik Croene (August '22):

We haven't found them yet, the words to talk to each other about the worrying signs of climate change. Feeling worried when walking on autumn leaves in the beginning of August should be completely normal. But how do we communicate about it? 't want to be just the next hysterical doomer.

With this music I try to focus on the climate pain itself, gently inviting the listener to investigate their latent feelings of unease and growing concerns about the environment. As in real life, we circumvent the real issues because they are just too big, there are no words,
no expressions yet.

This album tries, in four different attempts, to carve out a path towards communicating about a deeper pain that eventually will connect us all. My general method is to start with a comforting melody, full of fake nostalgia, which, after changing gear to autodestruct mode, morphs into a painful question mark.

The first part sets off with an idyllic melody, accompanied by repeated notes, as a far, muted echo of an alarm. The melody starts to explain itself painfully into a dissonant whirlwind in the high register, sounding not unlike Ravel's Gaspard de la Nuit bravura .

In the second piece a warm Beatles like melody (And I love her) gets confronted with the weird hippie mantra of a later Lennon song War is over, if you want it. Sentences get reduced to syllables and result in lonely notes that crash and shiver under the burden of too much meaning. Like Shostakovich's latest work, the Sonata for viola and piano.

The descending melody of Bach's Erbarme dich, Mein Gott is echoed in the upper and lower voicings of the third piece, juxtaposed to a typical, threatening Ennio Morricone Western dotted rhythm accompaniment. This rhythm eventually evolves into citing the 1972 Captain Beefheart early ecological warning song Blabber and Smoke (there's a big pane/pain in your window, it's gonna hang you all,… dangle you all).

Towards the middle of the piece, the music explodes and the three layers get dispersed all over the keyboard in a virtuosic maelstrom towards another painful question mark.

The bitter answer is going back to business with a barely noticeable citation of the first notes of the RZA's Liquid Swords album.
The final piece is some kind of mantra, the same 7/4 pulse all throughout the piece. The dampers of all A's and B's on the keyboard are released by the middle pedal, thus sustaining an ever present resonance. Melodic cells alternate in shifting quantifications with small, bell like percussive cluster playing.

While composing this piece an image crept up: walking out of the church on Sunday morning, tolling bells enthusiastically moderating the churchgoers' small talk in the local dialect. Apparently I have tried to evoke this kind of conversation, but injecting it with fictitious alarming conversation topics, the contemporary.

Artist: Frederik Croene 

Label: Cortizona