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Khan Jamal's Creative Arts Ensemble // Drum Dance To The Motherland LP

Khan Jamal's Creative Arts Ensemble // Drum Dance To The Motherland LP

€24,95
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*Will be shipped after restocking in mid-September

American vibraphonist Khan Jamal's phantom work, which was quietly recorded in 1972, has now been reissued on vinyl. Contains 50 dub jazz songs that are so fresh it's hard to believe they were made 4 years ago.

Below is a description of the label.

"There is no other album on earth that sounds quite like vibraphonist Khan Jamal's eccentric, one-of-a-kind masterpiece, Drum Dance To The Motherland. Thirty years after its release, this album's sonic tapestry, its daring... Invincible abstraction, relentless groove, cool swing, flashes of ecstasy, and pancultural embrace, powerful and category-defying. One of three albums released by Philadelphia label Dogtown. So, when it was released in the early 30s, it was hardly distributed outside the city.

This album is a truly brilliant record and classic session of musical exploration.An improbable fusion of free jazz expressionism, black psychedelia, and outright dub production techniques, Drum Dance is still alive, fifty years after it was recorded live at Philadelphia's Catacombs club in 1972. , remains a brave and powerful outsider statement.Comparisons with Sun Ra, King Tubby, Phil Colan, and BYG/Aktuel reveal the cosmic alienation evoked by the real-time enhancements of the Khan Jamal Creative Arts Ensemble and sound engineer Mario Farana. It is only suggestive.

It's clear that the members of Khan Jamal's Creative Arts Ensemble took pride in mastering the continuum of African-American music from their homeland through blues, R&B, jazz and free jazz. In the early '70s, these were fairly new ideas, but they were firmly entrenched in Philadelphia.The pursuit of African-American music that is contemporary, culturally progressive, yet rooted in African heritage is the heart and soul of this music.His connection to a particular African-American community in Philadelphia is a direct inspiration. "My ancestors show up in my music every time I play. I always say 'Africa is my backyard.'

Drum Dance To The Motherland was Jamal's 1973 limited edition release of 300 copies on Dogtown Records and was virtually a myth until it was reissued on CD by Elemite in 2005.Long since the master tapes were lost, the audio was transferred from a mint copy of the original LP at Sony Music's 54th Street Studios.Comes with an insert detailing the history of drum dance by Ed Hazel. Under license from Eremite Records. "

Labels and other works Click here for more information. ///Click here to see more Aguirre releases available at Tobira.

------------------------------

Aguirre Records:

"There's not another album on the planet that sounds even remotely like vibraphonist Khan Jamal's eccentric, one-of-a-kind masterpiece, Drum Dance To The Motherland. Thirty years after its release, the album's tapestry of sound, fearless abstractions, relentless grooves, cool swing, flashes of ecstasy, & pan cultural embrace remain powerful & beyond category. One of only three albums released on the Philadelphia-based Dogtown label, it was barely distributed beyond the city's limits when it came out in the early '70s.

Finally available again, a really stunning document of musical exploration, a classic session. In its improbable fusion of free jazz expressionism, black psychedelia, & full-on dub production techniques, Drum Dance remains a bracingly powerful outsider statement fifty years after it was recorded live at the Catacombs Club in Philadelphia, 1972. Sun RaKing TubbyPhil Cohran & BYG/Actuel merely hint at the cosmic otherness conjured by The Khan Jamal Creative Arts Ensemble & by sound engineers Mario FalanaMore's real-time enhancements.

Clearly, the members of the Khan Jamal Creative Arts Ensemble saw African American music as a continuum that stretched from the Motherland through the blues, R&B, jazz, & free jazz, & they prided themselves on mastering the continuum. In the early '70s, these were fairly new ideas, but they had taken firm root in Philadelphia. The search for an African American music that is modern & culturally progressive but rooted in an African tradition is the music's heart & soul. Its connection to the specific African American community in Philadelphia is its immediate inspiration. up in my music every time i play,” Jamal says.

Originally issued by Jamal in 1973 in an edition of three hundred copies on 'Dogtown' records, Drum Dance To The Motherland was effectively a myth until eramite's 2005 CD reissue. With the master tapes long vanished, the audio was transferred at Sony Music's 54th street studio from a minty copy of the original LP. Includes an insert with Ed Hazell's detailed telling of Drum Dance's incredible history. Under License From Eremite Records."

Artist : Khan Jamal's Creative Arts Ensemble

Label: Aguirre Records

*Will be shipped after restocking in mid-September

American vibraphonist Khan Jamal's phantom work, which was quietly recorded in 1972, has now been reissued on vinyl. Contains 50 dub jazz songs that are so fresh it's hard to believe they were made 4 years ago.

Below is a description of the label.

"There is no other album on earth that sounds quite like vibraphonist Khan Jamal's eccentric, one-of-a-kind masterpiece, Drum Dance To The Motherland. Thirty years after its release, this album's sonic tapestry, its daring... Invincible abstraction, relentless groove, cool swing, flashes of ecstasy, and pancultural embrace, powerful and category-defying. One of three albums released by Philadelphia label Dogtown. So, when it was released in the early 30s, it was hardly distributed outside the city.

This album is a truly brilliant record and classic session of musical exploration.An improbable fusion of free jazz expressionism, black psychedelia, and outright dub production techniques, Drum Dance is still alive, fifty years after it was recorded live at Philadelphia's Catacombs club in 1972. , remains a brave and powerful outsider statement.Comparisons with Sun Ra, King Tubby, Phil Colan, and BYG/Aktuel reveal the cosmic alienation evoked by the real-time enhancements of the Khan Jamal Creative Arts Ensemble and sound engineer Mario Farana. It is only suggestive.

It's clear that the members of Khan Jamal's Creative Arts Ensemble took pride in mastering the continuum of African-American music from their homeland through blues, R&B, jazz and free jazz. In the early '70s, these were fairly new ideas, but they were firmly entrenched in Philadelphia.The pursuit of African-American music that is contemporary, culturally progressive, yet rooted in African heritage is the heart and soul of this music.His connection to a particular African-American community in Philadelphia is a direct inspiration. "My ancestors show up in my music every time I play. I always say 'Africa is my backyard.'

Drum Dance To The Motherland was Jamal's 1973 limited edition release of 300 copies on Dogtown Records and was virtually a myth until it was reissued on CD by Elemite in 2005.Long since the master tapes were lost, the audio was transferred from a mint copy of the original LP at Sony Music's 54th Street Studios.Comes with an insert detailing the history of drum dance by Ed Hazel. Under license from Eremite Records. "

Labels and other works Click here for more information. ///Click here to see more Aguirre releases available at Tobira.

------------------------------

Aguirre Records:

"There's not another album on the planet that sounds even remotely like vibraphonist Khan Jamal's eccentric, one-of-a-kind masterpiece, Drum Dance To The Motherland. Thirty years after its release, the album's tapestry of sound, fearless abstractions, relentless grooves, cool swing, flashes of ecstasy, & pan cultural embrace remain powerful & beyond category. One of only three albums released on the Philadelphia-based Dogtown label, it was barely distributed beyond the city's limits when it came out in the early '70s.

Finally available again, a really stunning document of musical exploration, a classic session. In its improbable fusion of free jazz expressionism, black psychedelia, & full-on dub production techniques, Drum Dance remains a bracingly powerful outsider statement fifty years after it was recorded live at the Catacombs Club in Philadelphia, 1972. Sun RaKing TubbyPhil Cohran & BYG/Actuel merely hint at the cosmic otherness conjured by The Khan Jamal Creative Arts Ensemble & by sound engineers Mario FalanaMore's real-time enhancements.

Clearly, the members of the Khan Jamal Creative Arts Ensemble saw African American music as a continuum that stretched from the Motherland through the blues, R&B, jazz, & free jazz, & they prided themselves on mastering the continuum. In the early '70s, these were fairly new ideas, but they had taken firm root in Philadelphia. The search for an African American music that is modern & culturally progressive but rooted in an African tradition is the music's heart & soul. Its connection to the specific African American community in Philadelphia is its immediate inspiration. up in my music every time i play,” Jamal says.

Originally issued by Jamal in 1973 in an edition of three hundred copies on 'Dogtown' records, Drum Dance To The Motherland was effectively a myth until eramite's 2005 CD reissue. With the master tapes long vanished, the audio was transferred at Sony Music's 54th street studio from a minty copy of the original LP. Includes an insert with Ed Hazell's detailed telling of Drum Dance's incredible history. Under License From Eremite Records."

Artist : Khan Jamal's Creative Arts Ensemble

Label: Aguirre Records